I was gonna…

25 12 2016

The much-hated clip for one of Kylie’s most unpopular singles, by Melbourne avant garde director Dimitri Basil.  I have to say, I love it (sorry, not sorry).





Kylie: showgirl

25 12 2016

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Resplendent in the brass-and-plush-velvet foyer of the Victorian Arts Centre is this free exhibition of stage costumes by hometown showgirl Kylie Minogue. These range from her Hajime Sorayama robo-muse (circa “Can’t get You Out of My Head”) to Aussie-flag emblazoned and heavily shoulder-pad-endowed 1980s jackets.





Kylie’s disco Christmas

28 11 2016

 

A bonus track from the French and Italian versions of Kylie’s re-issued Christmas album of last year (dubbed the Snow Queen edition.) This continuation of her Christmas project consists of an oddly winning formula of high-calibre Minogue pop, quirky renditions of Christmas standards and knowingly camp Baz Luhrman-esque renditions of nineties club hits – plus this. Somehow, it all works.





Do it Again..

17 10 2016





Kylie’s Glacier of love

19 06 2016

Kylie Minogue took the stage this week as a surprise guest of singer John Grant, to perform a verse of his song “Glacier” in response to the Orlando massacre.

It was, to my mind, the perfect gesture – poised, eloquent and angrily heartbroken.

Listen to the lyrics carefully.





Retroooooo!

5 12 2015





The Kylie Christmas Album: My Thoughts

15 11 2015

Like many long-time fans of La Minogue, I was distinctly nonplussed by the announcement of a 2015 Christmas album. Here is a woman who had once set the charts alight, one of the globe’s great pop stars and a singer who had always exhibited exemplary taste: collaborating with Nick Cave, Towa Tei and Dev Hynes, appearing in Holy Motors and Moulin Rouge, being photographed by Stephane Sedanoui. Kylie’s great strength has always been her willingness to lob perpetually surprising career curve balls at her fans, and win them over and now here she was – this veteran of unexpected rock directions, collaborations with Japanese rappers and extended tours of South America – wallowing in her twilight years in that the nadir of pop music sophistication, the Christmas Album.

Depressing.

Except – it isn’t.

Having now heard the album I have had to totally re-evaluate my stance. Because many of the songs on it are, to be frank, pretty good. The standards are sung beautifully with joy and a complete absence of cynicism, together with covers like Only You, an early eighties new wave hit here covered as a duet with a hitherto-unknown-to-me UK Television comedian. But against all odds, its lovely. Another track, Christmas Wrapping, sees her team up with Iggy Pop (!) on a song where she raps (!!) pretty well (!!!!). White December is classic Kylie, a heat-seaking missile of a melody that buries into your brain and the disco-tastic 100 degrees is an explosion of Studio 54 disco goodness, shimmering through the snow, bedecked in tinsel.

It strikes me now that Kylie has, in fact, just performed her signature move again. She has bucked against her fans’ hopes and expectations – this time that she be “edgy” and current – swept aside their (and by that I mean “my”) prejudices, and shown them that they actually wanted her like this all along.

Unexpectedly, the Kylie Christmas album is a low-key triumph.